Thursday, November 5, 2015

Casting Light

  I mentioned in the previous post I made a nasty comment to Chrystal regarding people working under her not liking her.  The comment was out of line even though it was said to make a point.  Nevertheless, this comment was and still is a source of guilt.  Even though I apologized a short while after saying it, the matter bugged me enough later that night to contact the real Victoria that night.  This act lead to Victoria, Chrystal, and I all realizing my poor eyesight had caused a bad case of mistaken identity.   
The mistaken identity served as a blessing on two levels.  One, I backed off a heated situation that Saturday because I believed I was with Victoria.  Had I known it was Chrystal, the argument might have become more heated if she became defensive about her role in this whole mess.  Two, Chrystal became more sympathetic to my health issues.  I cannot see well enough to differentiate between two distinct people.  The disability is a dose of reality in the midst of corporate/Oakhaven's argument I did not need further healthcare, so I should be given the boot due to fabricated issues unrelated to healthcare.  The realization did not amount to much, but it was more understanding than Chrystal had prior to Saturday.
But the obvious problem still remained—I now had to deal with Chrystal and Victoria under our new circumstances.  They came to my room late Monday morning.  They were chipper.  Probably enjoyed a good laughing fir over my error.  It would not be the last time they smiled to each other knowingly while talking to me about problems with corporate/Oakhaven.
“Hey, Jamie!  It's Chrystal.”
“Are you sure?” I asked sardonically.
“Victoria is the one always in scrubs,”  Chrystal said.
Yeah, I know.  That is why I had never made the mistake on a working day.  But Saturday was a day off for both.  Scrubs were not a factor.  But I only entertained this thought internally.  There was no reason to make the situation tense before I heard what they needed to say to me.  It was still irksome.
The two took each one of the visitor chairs.  Chrystal spoke first.
“I got your email.  I did not consider it aggressive and badgering.  I actually though we got along well,' she said, then paused for a beat.  “But I guess that is because you thought I was Victoria.”
“Well, things might have been a bit different,” I said.  Hopefully, my response did not come across as inflammatory. 
“I'm also sorry that you think I have been rude.  Victoria doesn't think I was rude.”
Definitely a chap shot there.  Because I liked Victoria, I was supposed to accept hr opinion without question.  I opted to leave Victoria out of my response.  It was as close to taking the high road as was feasible under the circumstance.  
“When I asked to talk to someone from corporate, I was expecting someone would actually be interested in clearing up matters.  Instead, I got you lecturing me over my ingratitude for the Wi Fi  and claiming credit for my friendships—mostly with people like Ellen and Lesley who don't even work for Wilson.”
“I certainly did not mean to imply you owed us something for your friendships.  I was just trying to get you to see the bright side of being here.”
“For what purpose?  You all were already planning to discharge me.”
“I don't think so.” Chrystal said.
“Then what was the endgame?  Lofe did not want to take me off one on one even after I agree to leave.  The ombudsman's legal team forced you to do so.”
“I don't know what the endgame was.”
“You were at the meeting where I was personally attacked.”
“I really didn't know what was going to be said at that meeting,”  Crystal said.  She squirmed in her chair.  I was not certain if she was motivated by guilt over her participation in attacking me or embarrassment in being associated with an attack she knew nothing about beforehand.  Since she was the one to chose the wording for the threatening behavior/suicidal idealizations” put into my healthcare plan just before I was placed one on one, I am going to guess guilt as the culprit.  
“Do you have any idea why I was attacked personally?”  I asked.
“No, I don't know why you were attacked personally, Chrystal said.
I was becoming more and exasperated by the evasions of my questions.  I knew they were avoiding answering me to protect themselves from liability, which is in itself an admission of wrongdoing.  If corporate/Oakhaven had acted in a legitimate, ethical manner, they would not be so adamant about covering up their actions.   Nevertheless, I was not going to get anywhere by continuing.   I felt compelled for one more, though.
“How did we go from clarifying my right to visitation, which you eventually admitted you were wrong to curtail, to wrongfully discharging me?”
“I don't know.  Things just got out of hand.”  
Chrystal's answer remained the most substantive answer I received on the matter.  It would have to do.  As I no longer wished to go around in circles with questions without available answers, I clammed up.  There turned out to be little point to the meeting other than Chrystal and Victoria assuring me they became nurses because they were warm and caring and had not abandoned those characteristic in the slightest as they worked their way up the ladder to becoming the corporate shills sitting before.  Again, this is what I was thinking, but not what I said.  I let the whole issue slide until the two departed on what appeared to be reasonable satisfied terms.

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